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School of Natural Resources

Welcome to the School of Natural Resources


About


Mission

To produce adequately trained and equipped professional wood science, forestry, and wildlife, agro-forestry and fisheries human resource manpower and carry out research for sustainable development, management and utilization of forestry, wildlife and fisheries resources in Zambia and beyond.

Values

  1. Foster respect and use research evidence in teaching
  2. Uphold academic freedom
  3. Foster scholarship and research

The School of Natural resources has been in existence since 1996. The School was established from the need to train and develop sufficient human resources at both professional and technical levels in order to sustain development, management and utilization of the available natural resources, through research and initiatives aimed at maximizing the potential of these resources.

The School of Natural Resources has three departments namely; Zoology and Aquatic Sciences, Plant and Environmental Sciences and Biomaterial Sciences and Technology. These departments work towards providing quality training and education in environment and natural resources in order to contribute to sustainable management and utilization of natural resources, to meet the demand of various stakeholders.

The School of Natural Resources has 13 PhD holders and 39 Master of Science degree holders in various natural science based fields who are lecturers and researchers. While 13 members of staff are pursuing their PhD studies and 2 are pursuing their Masters programs in various fields.

The school boasts of attracting funding from external sources for research and infrastructure development. Organizations/countries funding school projects are the Danish, Finnish (Interim Environmental fund); Norwegian (NORHED); The Swedish Science Council; The Centre for International Forestry Research among others.


The Dean


The Dean

Prof. Exildah Chisha Kasumu

PhD, MSc Plant Sc, BSc (Hon. Agrof), BSc (Hon. For), Dip (For)

DEEP INTO NATURE


LOOK DEEP INTO NATURE , AND THEN YOU WILL UNDERSTAND EVERYTHING BETTER. ALBERT EINSTEIN PHYSCIST

MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN


ABOUT THE DEAN


Selected Publications

  1. Chisha-Kasumu, E., Price, A.H. and Woodward. S. (2006). In vitro shoot multiplication and rooting from seedling explants of Pterocarpus angolensis. Southern African Forestry Journal 208: 31 – 27.
  2. Chisha-Kasumu, E., Price, A.H. and Woodward. S. (2007). Comparison of the effects of mechanical scarification and gibberellic acid treatments on seed germination in Pterocarpus angolensis. Southern Hemisphere Forestry Journal 69 : 63 – 70.
  3. Chisha-Kasumu, E., Woodward. S. E. and Price, A.H. (2009). Phenotypic variation among five provenances of Pterocarpus angolensis in Zimbabwe and Zimbabwe. Southern Forests Journal 71: 41-47.
  4. Chisha-Kasumu, E., Woodward. S. E. and Price, A.H. (2009). RAPD markers demonstrate genetic diversity in Pterocarpus angolensis from Zimbabwe and Zimbabwe. Southern Forests Journal 71: 63-70.

Departments


Department Of Biomaterials Science and Technology (BST)


The Department of Plant and Environmental sciences was established in 2009 'to promote learning and research in plant sciences and environmental management and to contribute to a better understanding of the impacts and mitigation strategies for coping with future climate change'. This purpose still underpins’ PES’values of delivering knowledge and high research output in the field of plant and environmental sciences. PES has developed a regional track record for knowledge generation in sustainable natural resources management. In responding to the many daunting challenges in the field of NRM, PES is employing an interdisciplinary programme that is influencing policy change through education and research. PES has a regional reputation in research, with particular expertise in tropical ecosystems,agroforestry,forest ecology and management,and biodiversity conservation.

History

The department of Biomaterials Science and Technology has been offering undergraduate education since 2003. Currently the department offers a Bachelor of Science in Wood science and technology. This degree programme was reviewed in 2007 and 2014 in line with the University Strategic Plan 2014-2018 and, to be in tandem with forest industries and business, to this extent the department works very closely with commerce and industry.

The degree programmes that the department offer focus on developing building a strong foundation in Basic sciences, Wood sciences, Wood processing, Timber engineering, Joinery and furniture construction, Pulp and paper technology, Bioenergy technologies, Biofuels, Environmental management, as well as in Entrepreneurship and management in forest industries. The cohort of graduates being produced will help optimize the utilization of wood and non-wood products from plantation and indigenous forests in Zambia and the region.

The department boasts of a state-of-the-art Sawmill at Chati Plantation block in Lufwanyama district, where students regularly do their wood harvesting and sawmilling practical work and research. The department taps on the good will for industrial placement of students with several organizations, such as: National Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Zambia Bureau of Standards, Zambezi Paper Mills Ltd, Wood Processing Industries Ltd, Zambia Forestry and Forest Industry Coorporation, Rainland Timbers Ltd, Copperbelt Forestry Company Ltd, Kroup Wood Company Ltd and many more.

Research in the department is coordinated by a senior faculty member under three sub-themes, namely: Biochemicals and energy, Green construction materials and, Biomaterials value addition, entrepreneurship and marketing. Great strides have been made to establish partnerships, to foster research and consultancy. The research projects range from Wood quality and wood coatings performance, Biodegradation of wood poles, Xylarium and wood database for timber species in Zambia and, Bioaccumulation of chemical elements in livestock. Availability of research equipment which is house in the department and other university laboratories fosters quality research which has resulted in presentation in scientific fora and publication in international peer reviewed journals. Some of the state-of-the-art-research equipment items are: Quanta Scanning Electron Microscope for wood anatomy and microbial degradation analysis, LINTABTM tree ring research, and Testometric Universal Testing Machine for Quantification of mechanical properties of wood.

Current

Currently the department offers a Bachelor of Science in Wood science and technology. There are two areas of specialization, namely: (I) Wood technology and (II) Wood based materials and structures. Wood technology is a more industrial path to learn how wood can be processed into various products sustainably and efficiently while wood based materials and structures provides insights into the basic characteristics of wood and how it can be used as an engineering material and how to create the next generation engineered wood products such as structural laminates and value added wood products.

Admissions

To qualify for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Wood Science and Technology, a candidate must obtain credits in at least five subjects in the Zambian School Certificate or its equivalent as follows:

  • Compulsory Subjects
    1. English
    2. Mathematics
  • Any two(2) or three from the following
    1. Physics
    2. Chemistry
    3. Science
    4. Physical science
    5. Biology
    6. Agricultural
  • Any other subject from the following
    1. Wood science
    2. Technical/Geometrical drawing

For diploma holders, the applicant must possess a diploma related to the field of study being applied for. In addition, he or she must possess credit or better in at least five subjects in the Zambian school certificate or equivalent. The subjects must be the same as those in the case of school leavers above.

Careers

The employment prospects for Wood scientists and, Wood technologists are numerous given the diversity in the way forest products are used. The education imparted in wood science and technology is so broad and embraces other fields as well because of the strength and diversity of the curriculum.

Employment prospects are often found in manufacturing, construction, mining, marketing, technical services and management training, as well as in financial institutions, tertiary education while some become entrepreneurs. Other job opportunities are usually found in the private sector, government as a whole as well as in statutory institutions/boards.

Academic Staff

Head of Department

Head of Department

Ncube, D.
PhD Forest products (Brunel University), MSc Forest products (Buckinghamshire Chilterns University), BEd Educational management (University of Zimbabwe), Dipl Forest industries (Buckinghamshire Chilterns University), Dipl Technical education (Gweru Polytechnic)

Specialisation

  • Wood anatomy and Properties
  • Wood Physics
  • Engineering Drawing

Lecturer

Lecturer

NG’ANDWE, P. M.Sc. Forest Industries technology (University of Wales, UK), PgD Mechanical wood technology and production management (Kotka International College, Finland), B.Sc (Hon) Wood science (University of Wales, UK), Dipl Forestry (ZFC)
Specialisation

  • Engineered wood products
  • Markets and Trade

Lecturer

Lecturer

Malambo, M. F. MSc (University of Wales, UK), BSc Forestry (UDSM), PgD Mechanical wood industries (Kotka)
Specialisation

  • Wood Harvesting and Sawmilling Technology

Lecturer

Lecturer

Kipuputwa, C. MSc Wood Technology (Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, SA), BSc Wood science and technology (Copperbelt University, ZM)

Lecturer

Lecturer

Mwamba, B. MSc Forest industries technology (University of Wales, UK), BSc Forestry, PgD Forest industries technology, Dipl Forestry (Zambia College of Forestry, ZM)
Specialisation

  • Wood based panels technology

Lecturer

Lecturer

Sichamba, K.
MSc Wood science and engineering (Oregon State University, USA), BSc Wood science and technology (Copperbelt University, ZM)

Specialisation

  • Pulp and Paper Technology
  • Production and Inventory Control

Lecturer

Lecturer

Tembo, J. C. MBA (Double major) (Denver NTL and Vital, NSW Sydney), BBA (CBU)
Specialisation

  • Economics and marketing
  • I ndustrial organization and OHS
  • Entrepreneurship

Lecturer

Lecturer

Ngoma, J. MSc (SU_SA), BSc Wood science and technology (Copperbelt University, ZM), Dipl Wood technology (FITC_ZW), Dipl Forestry (Mwekera College ZM)

Lecturer

Lecturer

Munalula, F.
MSc Wood products (Stellenbosch University, SA), BSc (Hons) Wood products science (Stellenbosch University SA), BSc Wood science and technology (Copperbelt University, ZM), National Dipl Wood technology (Forest Industries Training Centre, ZW), Dipl Forestry (Zambia College of Forestry, ZM)

Lecturer

Lecturer

Mulenga, C. BSc Wood science and technology (Copperbelt University, ZM)

Department Of Plant & Environmental Sciences(PES)


The Department of Plant and Environmental sciences was established in 2009 'to promote learning and research in plant sciences and environmental management and to contribute to a better understanding of the impacts and mitigation strategies for coping with future climate change'. This purpose still underpins’ PES’values of delivering knowledge and high research output in the field of plant and environmental sciences. PES has developed a regional track record for knowledge generation in sustainable natural resources management. In responding to the many daunting challenges in the field of NRM, PES is employing an interdisciplinary programme that is influencing policy change through education and research. PES has a regional reputation in research, with particular expertise in tropical ecosystems,agroforestry,forest ecology and management,and biodiversity conservation.

Undergraduate Learning environment

PES offers four degrees; Agroforestry, Forestry, Plant & Environmental Sciences; Sustainable Natural Resource Management & Climate Change. The Departmenthas many local industrial tours, which enhance student learning experience, givesthem an opportunity to interactwithvarious professionals working in the forestry and agro sectors and put classroom based teaching in a real-life perspective. PES has two main overseas student-exchange programmes with the North Karelia University in Finland and The International Center for Agricultural Studies in Israelthat expose students to new learning environments.

Postgraduate study and research

PES offers taught Masters Programmes which include Natural Resources Management; Integrated Environmental Management and; Sustainable Agriculture. These taught postgraduate programmes are also offered on distance-learning programme. The distance learning programmes are primarily designed to allow students to undertake studies whilst working.

The department offers research degrees in a wide range of plant and environmental subjects; such as Forest Science; Natural Resources Management; Crop Science; and Agroforestry. Our programmes are taught professionally by staff with a wide range of both national and international experience.

Department Of Zoology and Acquatic Sciences (ZAS)


Department of Zoology and Aquatic Sciences is one of the three departments under School of Natural Resources of the Copperbelt University. It is located within the grounds of the School of Natural resources at Copperbelt University, in Kitwe, Zambia. Started in 2009, the department is relatively new, yet expanding rapidly. In line with the University strategic plan (2013-2018), the department will run more programmes in response to societal needs within Zambia, sub-region and internationally at a large. It has strong course curricula that lay the basis for well-equipped graduates. The course curricula prepare the students to discharge their knowledge and services in diverse and dynamic environments in the wildlife and fisheries industries, and other related environments for socio-economic development.

Undergraduate Degree Programmes

Currently, the Department of Zoology and Aquatic Sciences (ZAS) runs two, 4-year undergraduate degree programmes, namely (1) BSc Wildlife Management and (2) BSc Fisheries and Aquaculture. The department is constantly redesigning the contents of these programmes to meet emerging needs in the fisheries and Wildlife sectors. In addition, the department is in the process of expanding by introducing new programmes, namely B.Sc. Fisheries Management, and B.Sc.

Aquaculture which have since been submitted to senate for approval. Besides, the department has started developing new programmes in such areas Behavioural ecology as well as Tourism and conservation. The training activities at undergraduate level are highly backed by a series of practicals and this is key to enhancing the capacity of our students. Practicals range from training-driven laboratory experiments to field trips of such areas as game and fisheries reserves as well as aquacultural facilities within and outside the Copperbelt province. During such field trips, students enjoy the opportunity of not only having real time experience, but also interacting with experts in their respective fields of study.

Postgraduate Degree Programmes

The department has developed a postgraduate programme in Tropical Ecology and Biodiversity Management, which has since been submitted to senate for approval. Once approved, this will be a unique programme aimed at qualifying graduates to deal with the huge challenges facing present-day biodiversity managers in tropical regions, with huge emphasis on Sub-Sahara Africa. It is the first programme of its kind in Zambia and will seek to integrate scientific with some socio-economic principles for the purpose of establishing a wide understanding of complex conservation issues and designing effective intervention measures to conserve biodiversity. The teaching staff is actively involved in research and the students will benefit from our many connections within and outside the African continent.

This blend of expertise will ensure that our programmes deliver the skills and knowledge that are essential components of managing biological diversity for the benefit of both present and future generations. The postgraduate programme will be available at three stages, namely a taught MSc, MPhil and PhD. Training will be available on full-time, part-time or by distance. While the MPhil and PhD will be characterised by largely undertaking field based research, the taught MSc will cover a range of topics, from quantitative biology and ecological sampling techniques to such key areas climate change and biodiversity, biodiversity and poverty alleviation and invasion ecology. At either level, the programme will allow students to undertake an independent, yet original, high quality research, which culminates in the submission of a thesis and publication of results in peer reviewed journals. The are further in the process of developing new programs in such key areas as Natural Resource Governance and Economics, Tourism, Conservation planning and Conservation biology.

Career Prospects

There are excellent employment opportunities in the broad area of biodiversity management and graduates from programmes offered in our department may work in such organisations as conservation and national government agencies for environment, agriculture, wildlife, forestry, tourism, local government, lands and disaster management. Others may work as University lecturers (postgraduates), join international organisations (e.g. African Parks, WWF, UNDP, UNEP, USAID, AWF, IUCN, and Nature Conservancy) or become employers by opening their own enterprises such as community and private game ranches, fish farms, consultancies, etc. Graduates from the taught MSc programme will enjoy a broad based modular course that will teach both the practical and theoretical aspects of biodiversity and conservation. Successful students will therefore develop the skills and experience required to enable progression onto PhD studies in a wide-range of biological, environmental and conservation related subjects either at CBU or abroad.

Academic Staff

The department has a compliment of 14 highly qualified staff members, all of which have at least an MSc as a minimum qualification. The academic staff is specialized in a diversity of fields within the context of terrestrial and aquatic ecological sciences. Such a diversity of skills ensures that our students with different research interest and career prospects are provided with the necessary support to attain their capacity goals. Over the years, a number of our staff have been involved in both teaching as well as undertaking high level research in various fields, resulting into the publication several papers in various peer reviewed Journals.

Head of Department

Head of Department

CHAMA, L.
PhD in Natural Sciences – University of Marburg, Germany; MSc Biodiversity and Conservation – University of Exeter, UK Dip. Forestry – Zambia Forestry College

Lecturer

Lecturer

Namukonde, N.
MSc Conservation Biology, National University of Malaysia (UKM) BSc (Biological Science) University of Zambia

Lecturer

Lecturer

SIACHOONO , M. S.
BA (LLB) 2010 MSc Natural Resources Management (1991) Agric University of Norway BSc Biology and Chemistry. University of Zambia (1979)


Programmes of Study


Undergraduate Programs

  • Bachelor of Sciece in Wildlife Biology and Management
  • Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Aquaculture
  • Bachelor of Science in Agroforestry
  • Bachelor of Science in Wood Science and Technology
  • Bachelor of Science in Forestry

Postgraduate Programs

The school offers one post graduate program in Natural Resources Management and it is in the process of introducing more graduate programs in Conservation Ecology, Integrated Environmental Management, Renewable Energy, and Sustainable Agriculture.


Admissions


Requirements

To qualify for admission to degrees programmes in school of Natural Sciences, a candidate must obtain credits or better in at least five subjects in the Zambian School Certificate or its equivalent as follows:

  1. Have '0' level passes in Mathematics and English, which are compulsory and compose schedule A of the required courses;
  2. Have '0' level passes in either one or two subjects from schedule B, and;
  3. Have '0' level passes in one or two subjects from schedule C to make a total of five subjects

Compulsory Subjects

  1. English Language
  2. Mathematics
  3. Biology or Agricultural Science

Any one (1) or two (2) from the following

  1. Physics
  2. Chemistry;
  3. Science
  4. Physical Science
  5. Physical Science

Any one other subject

Diploma Holders : For diploma holders, he or she should possess a diploma related to the field of study being applied for without classifying the diploma. In addition he or she should possess, passes in at least five subjects in the Zambia School Certificate or equivalent. The subjects indicated are the same as those in the case of school leavers.


Rules & Regulations



Careers



Research & Projects


The School is actively involved in research and consultancy work. The school owns quiet a number of equipment and infrastructure to conduct its research for example: The school has a well furnished Tissue Culture Laboratory and a greenhouse to conduct plant science experiments, a gas analyser plus many more.

In the year 2014 the school managed to publish 26 papers in peer reviewed journals and books. The school involves its students in conducting research as much as possible and this creates a lot of interactions with our students.

Externally Funded projects

The school attracts funding for projects from quite a number of organisations and some of them are:

  1. The Interim Environmental Fund: The project is funded by the Finnish and Danish governments. The project is on wild tubers and bulbs (chikanda, busala and mumbu) and their propagation, commercialisation and distribution in central province of Zambia. The project is worth about US $850,000. Students and staff are involved in research leading to publication of papers.
  2. NORAD (NORHED) project: the project is funded by the Norwegian government and CBU is in partnership with the University of Stellenbosch, Norwegian University of Life Sciences and the Southern African Wildlife College of South Africa. The project is worth about 2.9 million US dollars. The money is to be used for Developing Masters program modules, data base management, scholarships and construction of classrooms for the University. CBU has already taken 8 scholarships.
  3. The Swedish Science Council: The project is about green economy development in Zambia-Forest restoration in mining wastelands. The money involved is SEK4,404,000 and the money is meant for research. Staff and students are involved in research activities. Students and staff are involved in research leading to publication of papers.
  4. The Swedish Science Council: the money involved is SEK600,000 and it is being used for natural resources research costing. Students and staff are involved in research leading to publication of papers.
  5. The Centre for International Forestry Research: Scoping visit for a research consultancy titled; Wood Energy use in Fish Processing, in Luwingu and Mbala Districts in Northern Province of Zambia has already been done by SNR staff awaiting approval and full funding.

Ongoing research projects

  1. Ncube, E., Prof. Nkonde, G., and Mpala, P. , Effects of Amonia on Growth of Broiler Chickens. Copperbelt University and NICHE Project.
  2. Ncube, E. , Dr. Meincken, M., and Malambo, F. , Discoloration of Five Damaged Pinus Species Timber from Zambia and Effects on the Performance of Wood Coatings.
  3. Ncube, E., Malambo, F., Ng’andwe, P., and Dr. Chaamwe, N. , Xylarum And Web Based Wood Data Base For Commercial, User Used And Lesser Known Timber Species In Zambia.
  4. Simuchimba, G., Kapembwa, S. and Mambwe, D. (2014) . Performance of Aquaculture-Horticulture Integration in the North Western Province of Zambia: Solwezi, Mwinilunga, Zambezi, Mufumbwe, and Kasempa (North western province).
  5. Nalanvwe, A., Chisha-Kasumu, E., Kalinda, C. and Vinya, R. Growth response of chikanda to organic and in-organic fertilizers.
  6. Nalanvwe, A., Chisha-Kasumu, E., Kalinda, C. and Vinya. R. Growth response of chikanda to dambo and miombo soils.
  7. van der Ent, A., Erskine, P., Mulligan, D., Vinya, R., Maseka, K.K. and Siame, J. The potential of Zambian Copper-Cobalt hyperaccumulator plants for phytoremediation of polluted (mining/smelter) soils. A collaborative Action Research with the University of Queensland Australia. Funded by the International Mining for Development Cooperation (IM4DC).
  8. Vinya, R., Kalinda, C. and Mambwe, D. Influence of fertilization on plant functional traits and physiological performance of Baikea plurijuga.
  9. Vinya, R. and Banda, R. Long-term carbon dynamics in miombo woodlands in Zambia.

2015 Publication List.

  1. Chirwa, P.W., Larwanou, M., Syampungani, S. and Babalola, F.D. (2015). Management and restoration practices in degraded landscapes of Southern Africa and requirements for up-scaling. International Forestry Review 16. In press.
  2. Chirwa, P.W., Larwanou, M., Syampungani, S. and Babalola, F.D. (2015). Management and restoration practices in degraded landscapes of Eastern Africa and requirements for up-scaling. International Forestry Review 16. In press.
  3. Monde C., Syampungani, S. and Paul J. Van den Brink, P.J. V. (2015). Exploring the potential of host-parasite relationship in the control of Schistosomiasis in Africa. African Journal of Aquatic Sciences.
  4. Kalinda, C. , Ziyaye, M., Chama, L., Lwali, A. C., Zulu, D., Phiri, D. and Chisha-Kasumu E. (2015) Impact and challenges of Jatropha Curcas Projects in North-Western Province, Zambia: A case of Solwezi District. Sustainability 7 1-xmanuscripts; doi:10.3390/su70x000x.
  5. Stanford M. Siachoono (2015). Considerations for additional tools in ecosystems management: Lessons from Zambia. International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation. In press

2014 Publication List

  1. Berens, D.G., Chama, L. , Albrecht, L. and Farwig, N. (2014). High Conservation Value of Forest Fragments for Plant and Frugivore Communities in a Fragmented Forest Landscape in South Africa. BIOTROPICA 46(3): 350–356.
  2. Chali, M., Musuka, C.G. and Nyimbili, B. (2014). The impact of fishing pressure on Kapenta (Limnothrissa miodon) production in Lake Kariba, Zambia: A case study of Siavonga District. International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 2(6): 107-116.
  3. Chimba, N. and Musuka, C. G. (2014). Impact of Closed Fishing Season on the Livelihood of Fishers: A Case of Stratum I of Kafue Fishery. International Journal of Life Sciences Research ISSN 2348-3148 (online) 2(1): 49-62.
  4. Chirwa, P.W., Syampungani, S. and Geldenhuys, C.J. (2014). Managing Southern African Woodlands for Biomass Production: The Potential Challenges and Opportunities. In: Bio-energy from Wood: Sustainable production in Tropics, Managing Forest Ecosystems. Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 67-87.
  5. Chomba, C., Chimbola, O. and Nyirenda, V. (2014). Game ranching: a sustainable land use option and economic incentive for biodiversity conservation in Zambia. Open Journal of Ecology 4(9): 571-581.
  6. Chomba, C., Senzota R., Chabwela H. N. and Nyirenda V. R. (2014). Patterns in the performance of the crocodile farming industry in Zambia: a bio-safety and backup strategy for the long-term survival of the crocodile population in the wild. Interdisciplinary Review of Economics and Management 3(2): 25-38.
  7. Chomba, C., Simpamba, T., Kampamba, G. and Nyirenda, V. (2014). Do the Luangwa hippo population size and density distribution vary between upper and lower study blocks? What are the management implications of such distribution pattern? Open Journal of Ecology 4: 262-280.
  8. Dyer, J, Stringer, L.C., Dougill, A.J., Leventon, J., Nshimbi, M., Chama, F., Kafwifwi, A. J.I., Muledi, J., Kaumbu, M.K., Falcao, M., Muhorro ,S., Munyemba, F., Kalaba G.M. and Syampungani, S. (2014). Assessing participatory practices in community-based natural resource management: Experiences in community engagement from southern Africa. Journal of Environmental Management 37: 137–145.
  9. German, L., Mandondo, A., Paumgarten, F. and Mwita, J. (2014). Shifting rights, property and authority in the forest frontier: ‘stakes’ for local land users and citizens. Journal of Peasant Studies 41: 51-78.
  10. Kalaba F.K. , 2014. A conceptual framework for understanding forest socio-ecological systems, Journal of Biodiversity Conservation, DOI 10.1007/s10531-014-0792-5.
  11. Kalaba F.K. , Quinn, C.H. and Dougill, A.J.(2014). Policy coherence and interplay between Zambia’s forest, energy, agricultural and climate change policies and multilateral environmental agreements. International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics 14:181-198.
  12. Kaonga, B. (2014). Atmospheric Aerosol Loading (PM10) During 12 Months Period at Phokeng in Rustenburg, South Africa. European Journal of Scientific Research 123(2).
  13. Kaonga, B. and Ebenso, E.E. (2014). Atmospheric aerosol loading (pm10) during a twelve month period at phokeng in Rustenburg, South Africa. European Journal of Scientific Research. 123(2): 117-128.
  14. Lindsey, P., Nyirenda, V. , Barnes, J., Becker, M., McRobb, R., Tambling, C., Taylor, A., Watson, F. and t’Sas Rolfes, M. (2014). Underperformance of African protected area networks and the case for new conservation models: insights from Zambia. PLoS One 9(5):
  15. Mwimanzi, and Musuka, C. (2014). The Potential of Mopani Worm (Gonimbrasia belina) as an Alternative Protein Source in Fish Feed, International Journal of Aquaculture 4(12): 73-78.
  16. Moonga, K. and Musuka, C.G. (2014). The Effect of Accidentally Introduced Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus Clarkii) in Kafue Fishery, International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 2(1): 8--15.
  17. Namukonde, N. (2014). An Assessment of Puku (Kobus vardonii) Populations in Kafue National Park, Zambia Using Ground transects other than the Road Network. Journal of Life Sciences 6(1-2): 13-23.
  18. Nyawali, B., Chungu, D., Chisha-Kasumu, E., Vinya, R., Chileshe, F. and Ng'andwe, P. (2015). Enzymatic browning reduction in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea) using honey: Does honey color matter? Journal of Food Science and Technology 61: 543-549.
  19. Ncube, E., Chungu, D., Ng’andwe, P. , Kamdem, D.P., Chongo, A. and Mwale, E. (2014). Premature failure of creosote treated electricity transmission wood poles in Zambia. Proceedings of the 57th International Convention of Society of Wood Science and Technology 57: 745-752.
  20. Nkhoma, and Musuka, C. (2014). Effect of Commercial Feed on Sexual Maturity of Two Tilapia Species (Oroechromis niloticus and Oreochromis tanganicae), International Journal of Aquaculture 4(16): 96-101.
  21. Nkonde, G. K., Kasongole, W. C. and Simuchimba, G. (2014). The potential of moringa seed extract as a natural coagulant for shallow well water treatment. Zambian Journal of Chemical Engineering (ZJChE) 3(1): 41-44.
  22. Nyirenda, V. R. , Siamudaala, V. M. and Kaula, M. (2014). Management effectiveness and potential for tourism of peri-urban Lusaka National Park, Zambia: a preliminary assessment. Environment and Natural Resources Research 4(1): 117-129.
  23. Phiri, K. and Musuka, C.G. (2014). The diversity of fish species in Ngwerere Stream of Chongwe District in Lusaka Province, Zambia. International Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 2(6): 101-106.
  24. Sakala, and Musuka, C. (2014). The Effect of Ammonia on Growth and Survival of Tilapia rendalli in Quail manured tanks, International Journal of Aquaculture 4(22): 1-6.
  25. Stringer L.C., Dougill A.J., Dyer J.C., Leventon J. , Vincent K., Fritzsche F., Falcão M.P., Manyakaidze P., Syampungani S. , Kalaba G. and Powell P. (2014). Advancing climate compatible development: lessons from southern Africa, Regional Environmental Change 14: 713-725.
  26. Syampungani, S. , Clendening J., Gumbo, D., Nasi, R., Moombe, K. and Chirwa, P.W. (2014). The Impact of land use and cover change on above and below-ground carbon stocks of the Miombo woodlands since the 1950s: A systematic review protocol. Environmental Evidence 3: 25.

Linkages & Partnerships


Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) and collaboration

The school of natural resources has several MoUs with both international and local organisations. and some of them are:

  1. The Zambezi North South-South: involving North Karelia, Olu (Finland), Namibia, CBU, Botswana and Mulungushi Universities. The project involves student and staff exchanges and short course programs for our students among others.
  2. Zambia College of Agriculture (Mpika campus). Affiliation of the college’s diploma programme in Sustainable Agriculture.
  3. Zambia Forestry and Forest Industries Cooperation (ZAFFICO): Involves student attachments, timber supplies to the chati sawmill plus any other.
  4. Insaka consortium: involving the Montana (America), KwaZulu Natal; Monash (South Africa), CBU, Namibia and these universities collaborate on community based issues and natural sciences.
  5. Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA): Student practicals and research.
  6. Kasanka Trust Ltd: Student practicals and research.

Visiting Lecturer Scheme and Staff exchange

Our staff are recognised to a situation whereby, they are involved in staff exchange programs for the benefit of doing research and lecturing. Our Academic staff have been to Finland for short visit lectures and one is about to leave for Britain for research in 2015.

Student Exchange Programmes

Our students in the School of Natural Resources have a privilege of going elsewhere for student exchange for example we have students going to Finland once in year for 6 months to learn out there. The program is made possible by financial support from the Finish Government through the Zambezi North South South project and the Copperbelt University.

We also have links with the Israeli government and once a year our students go on internship for almost one year. Currently we have Fourteen (14) 3rd year agroforestry and forestry students who are on internship with the Agrostudies program, the International Center for Agricultural Interns in Israel Ltd. The Copperbelt University provides financial support for travel these students.

Student exchange programs aim at exposing our students to the world and appreciate how things are done elsewhere. All our third year students have also got a chance to be attached to industry in their relevant fields to enhance their understanding of things learnt in class.


Consultancy


Consultancy and externally funded research projects

  1. Vinya, R. Kasumu, E.C., Syampungani, S. Monde, C. and Kasubika, R. Preliminary Study on the Drivers of Deforestation and Potential for REDD+ in Zambia. Study Funded by FAO
  2. Phillimon Ngandwe, Felix Njovu, Exildah Chisha-Kasumu, Jane K Ndhlovu ; Determination of Compensation Claim. Funded by Ndola Pine Plantation Limited.
  3. Phillimon Ngandwe, Felix Njovu, Exildah Chisha-Kasumu, Jane K Ndhlovu ; Determination of Compensation Claim. Funded by the Zambia Forest and Forestry Industries Cooperation (ZAFFICO)..
  4. Syampungani S. Assessing Institutional & Governance Partnerships for Climate-Compatible Development in Sub-Saharan Africa (Client: Climate Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Fund-DFID, UK: Joint Research between universities; University of Leeds, University of Lubumbashi, Eduardo Mondlane University, Copperbelt University).

Boards




Calendar & Resources



Contacts


        

The Dean, School of Natural Resources, The Copperbelt University, Jambo Drive, Riverside, P.o.Box 21692, Kitwe, ZAMBIA


        

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